The Autumn 2020 Issue of The Beckett Circle is Now Available Online

Inside this issue The second issue of the Beckett Circle to be posted in the time of pandemic bears the scars of the community’s endurance of uncertainty and loss. As performance, in its normal sense has disappeared, we hear from practitioners Sarah Jane Scaife and Cathal Quinn about their attempts to overcome the restricted environment.…

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Special Offer on BDMP companion volumes

For a limited period, the publisher ASP is offering 3 for the price of 2 on their range of companion volumes to modules in the Beckett Digital Manuscript Project. At present, there are eight titles in this series and have proved to be invaluable for all those engaging with the project. To avail of the…

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Call For Submissions: Corresponding with Samuel Beckett

Corresponding with Samuel Beckett is an edition of critical essays that forms a major intervention in key debates on the use of Nobel prize winning author Samuel Beckett’s correspondence in literary and cultural studies and in the digital humanities.

What does it mean to correspond with Beckett? How does Beckett’s correspondence give us insight into the work? In what ways are critical reading and writing a form of correspondence with an author? The publication of the fourth and final volume of The Letters of Samuel Beckett marks an appropriate moment to take stock of the role of autobiography in research, and the importance of the epistolary in literary studies. Corresponding with Samuel Beckett examines issues around the development of the grey archive, the use of digital resources, translation, visual metadata, and the role of corollary correspondence. Given Beckett’s hesitation to render the personal public, the book examines what is at stake in negotiating issues of privacy, permissions, and copyright. The book generates new thinking on the letter as artefact, and the textual and stylistic aspects of the epistolary. It explores the legacy of a correspondence project and how the research that underpins it can be deployed for further research. Using literary correspondence and related materials raises older literary questions on authorial intention and reading methodologies that continue to inform literary analysis. In the age of twitter, snapchat and whatsapp correspondence is primarily digital: the edition will question the longevity of contemporary digital correspondence, and explore strategies for future engagement with the epistolary in literary research.

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New Georgian Translation of Waiting for Godot

In March 2020 Inga Zhghenti’s translation of Waiting for Godot received critical acclaim as the first Georgian translation of Beckett’s play (from the English text). The translation has been uploaded to the Internet Archive of Georgian Theatre, and is available here. Zhghenti is currently an associate professor at East European University and an invited lecturer at Caucasus University.

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