Samuel Beckett Featured on BBC Radio 4’s Great Lives

BBC Radio 4: “Business guru Sir Gerry Robinson was born in Ireland but moved to England in his teens, and he chooses Samuel Beckett, another Irishman who lived away for much of his life – in Paris. Gerry, a late convert to Beckett’s plays, loves him because he’s accepting of the human condition: that we’re all locked in this repetitive pattern. We don’t want to keep on doing the same thing over and over again, but we do. Presenter Matthew Parris is also joined by Jim Knowlson, who was a personal friend of Samuel Beckett for 19 years, and is his authorised biographer. He reveals that Beckett was far from the dour gloomy figure of popular imagination, and was in fact very good company – as long as you didn’t interrupt him when he was watching the rugby on the telly on a Saturday afternoon. Producer Beth O’Dea.”

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Michael Coffey on his book, Samuel Beckett Is Closed

“[A]ny attempt to get a handle on Beckett takes you to into interesting territory—to classical music, Irish history, Continental philosophy, World War II, abstract painting, the French language. For a quiet man his interests were voracious. Beckett scholarship has ranged far beyond those seminal early essays by Maurice Blanchot and Theodor Adorno and the studies by Ruby Cohn and Lawrence Harvey. Now, with James Knowlson’s authorized biography, the recently released four volumes of letters, and the digital manuscript project going on in Antwerp, the study of his works is vibrant all around the world.”

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Emilie Morin: New Insights into Beckett’s Politics

Cambridge University Press: “In this interview with Emilie Morin, author of Beckett’s Political Imagination, we discuss what prompted Emilie to write a book on Beckett’s politics, and why Beckett traditionally is not considered to be a political playwright. Emilie also explains how Beckett’s political outlook is reflected in his writing, and she tells us what has surprised her the most when researching for this new book.”

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The Beckett Circle (Autumn 2017)

Inside the latest issue: Authorised Beckett biographer James Knowlson shares previously unpublished insights into Beckett’s busy routine; Rodney Sharkey recounts his time collaborating with prison inmates on Endgame and Waiting for Godot; Hannah Simpson talks to actress Jess Thom about her recent production of Not I, where Thom reflects on how her experiences with Tourette’s syndrome inform her performance as Mouth;  Jonathan Heron pays tribute to the late Rosemary Pountney with an account of the End/Lessness project; Zoe Gosling attends an innovative performance and panel centring on the late prose text, Company; and Derval Tubridy attends an evening of Beckett and contemporary art hosted by The Wallace Collection.

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