Call for Papers for Proposed Edited Volume: Samuel Beckett and the 21st Century Novel

A call for papers has been issued by ibidem-verlag’s ‘Samuel Beckett in Company’ series editor, Paul Stewart, Professor of Literature, University of Nicosia, for a proposed edited volume with the title Samuel Beckett and the 21st Century Novel. Professor Stewart writes: ‘Beckett’s influence on an older generation of novelists, such as Coetzee, Banville, Auster and…

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A new Spanish translation of Lessness/Sans

A new Spanish translation of Lessness/Sans has been announced by Árdora Ediciones in Madrid. The volume is novel in that it contains four versions of the same text: Beckett’s original Sans (1969), followed by its translation into Spanish by Loreto Casado, and Beckett’s original Lessness (1970), followed by its translation into Spanish by José Francisco Fernández. Fernández explained the…

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New Title: Samuel Beckett and Technology. Eds Galina Kiryushina, Einat Adar & Mark Nixon (Edinburgh University Press)

Coming imminently from Edinburgh University Publishing is Samuel Beckett and Technology, edited by Galina Kiryushina, Einat Adar and Mark Nixon. Drawn from the conference of the same name which was held in Charles University, Prague in 2018, this new volume aims for ‘a comprehensive discussion of the role technology plays in shaping Beckett’s trademark aesthetics’ by…

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Two new books on Beckett and translation

This autumn sees the publication of two books which address the issue of translation in Beckett’s oeuvre. Samuel Beckett and Translation (Palgrave), edited by José Francisco Fernández and Mar Garre García adresses a number of themes including Beckett’s self-translations, translations of other authors and the poetics of translation, in a collection comprising thirteen chapters followed…

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New Publication: Beckett and Buddhism by Angela Moorjani

Beckett and Buddhism is a new work from Cambridge University Press by long-time Beckett scholar and Society member Angela Moorjani . Drawing on letters and archives along with recent studies of Buddhist thought and Schopenhauer’s knowledge of it, the book charts the Buddhist concepts circling through Beckett’s visions of the ‘human predicament’. Moorjani offers an…

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The Autumn 2020 Issue of The Beckett Circle is Now Available Online

Inside this issue The second issue of the Beckett Circle to be posted in the time of pandemic bears the scars of the community’s endurance of uncertainty and loss. As performance, in its normal sense has disappeared, we hear from practitioners Sarah Jane Scaife and Cathal Quinn about their attempts to overcome the restricted environment.…

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The Spring 2020 Issue of The Beckett Circle is Now Available Online

“This issue covers performances in the US (among them the Happy Days Renaissance Theaterworks production in downtown Milwaukee and Richard Sullivan Jr.’s Waiting for Godot in Providence, RI), Australia (Mark Byron reviews the Red Line Productions’ staging of Krapp’s Last Tape at the Old Fitz Theatre in Sydney), London, Paris and Dublin. We have rich resources to rethink the Beckett oeuvre in the context of contemporary music, as the Farmleigh Music and Arts festival and the What is the Word… concert organised by Benjamin Dwyer at the Centre Culturel Irlandaise in Paris show. A panel on the Battle of Ideas Festival at the Barbican, the role played by Beckett in shaping the “Fail Better” series of the Poet in the City at Wilton’s Music Hall in London, and an account of number of symposia keep demonstrating Beckett’s continuous cultural importance…”

— Extract from the joint President’s Address from Daniela Caselli (sitting president) and Laura Salisbury (president elect).

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The Autumn 2019 Issue of The Beckett Circle Is Now Online

Our new issue of The Beckett Circle is extremely rich. Professor Jim Knowlson talks to the well-known British actor David Neilson about the very different fates of two of Beckett’s most famous manuscripts: Murphy and Waiting for Godot. I had the great pleasure of seeing David Neilson act in Endgame here in Manchester, and the Society is delighted to host this dialogue. The ‘Happy Days: Enniskillen International Beckett Festival’ of 2019 takes centre stage in our issue. In its seventh edition under the guidance of Artistic Director Sean Doran, it has offered a rich programme: in this issue, Feargal Whelan’s interviews Clara Simpson’s bilingual production of Pas Moiand Not I, and Emma Keanie reviews her performance – both will speak to those among us interested in translation not only on the page but also on stage. Brenda O’Connell and Sean Walsh review what sounds like a spectacular interpretation of Come and Go, Catastrophe, and Quad by the Mark Morris Dance Group. I’d like to draw your attention also to Sheila Mannix’s review of How It Is (Part 2) by Gare St Lazare Ireland at The Everyman in Cork.

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