Marcus Lamb performs Beckett’s First Love

First Love is performed by Marcus Lamb who recently played Bob Cratchit in the feature film The Man who Invented Christmas and Dr. James Oakley in RTÉ’s Fair City. Marcus also enthralled the audience with his performance in The End, last year’s Beckett in Foxrock production.

Beckett in Foxrock 2018 – First Love is the third annual celebration of the Nobel Laureate’s close connection with Foxrock. Samuel Beckett was born and brought up in Brighton Road, just yards from Tullow Church which he attended in the company of his mother. The Foxrock area and many of its residents feature in much of his work.

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Transdisciplinary Beckett: 4th Samuel Beckett Society Annual Conference, 2018

The Fourth Beckett Society Conference will take place in Mexico City, on 7-10 November 2018. ‘Transdisciplinary Beckett’ is especially interested in recognising the role that radio, television, theatre, music, the arts, sciences, and technologies play in Beckett Studies.

Samuel Beckett is a precursor in the creation of transdisciplinary works. He travelled between languages [English-French-German], genres [narrative, poetry, theatre, essay], and media [radio, television, cinema]. His work has been studied and applied across different perspectives and disciplines, ranging from literature, philosophy, and media, to political sciences, music, and contemporary art practices. Carrying out a transdisciplinary approach allows us to re-conceptualize Beckett as an author who found in different technologies and electronic languages new ways to think about our present time.

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Eimear McBride on Beckett’s Development as a Writer

“Of all I’ve read in my life, and all that’s yet to come, what’s going to count? How much of it has changed me? How much has even marked me? How much has done both but I don’t know it yet? Readers get to make these discoveries in the privacy of their own heads. Writers must make them in public and then wear them in their back catalogues for as long as they have a readership who cares.”

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New Production of Morton Feldman & Samuel Beckett’s Words and Music

An assembly are a group dedicated to experimental and contemporary music, installation, and performance.

Their first event of 2018 sees a rare performance of one of Feldman’s final works, ‘Words and Music’, a collaboration with one of the 20th century’s greatest writers, Samuel Beckett. Originally conceived as a radio-play, this 40-minute piece exhibits two of the 20th century’s greatest artists at their creative peak. Haunting fragments of text and sound gently discourse and overlap in an intimate meditation on themes such as love, age, and truth.

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Samuel Beckett: Style Icon?

Here at the Samuel Beckett Society, we’re not sure what to make of Robert Armstrong’s recent piece in the Financial Times about the end of the male style icon. Armstrong is wistful for a simpler time, when male celebrity figures were supposedly emulated and celebrated for their sartorial choices. What do you think? Does Beckett’s dress code influence the way we think about him as a writer and public figure? Or are these things irrelevant to the books and plays that we love?

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Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Aftermath

Oxford University Press: “[James McNaughton’s] Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Aftermath explores Beckett’s creative responses to the Irish civil war and the crisis of commitment in 1930s Europe, to the rise of fascism, and the atrocities of World War II. Grounded in archival material, the volume reads in Beckett’s letters and German Diaries his personal response to propaganda he saw leading to war, and illustrates his creative work’s intimate engagement with specific political strategies, rhetoric, and events.

Deep into literary form, syntax, and language, Beckett reflects ominous political and historical changes, and satirizes aesthetic and philosophical interpretations that overlook them. He burdens aesthetic production with guilt for how imagination and language, theatre, and narrative parallel political techniques, the aspiration to both effect atrocity and cover it up. This book develops new readings of Beckett’s early and middle work up toThree Novels and Endgame.”

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