Writer and academic John Samuel Bolin on Samuel Beckett

“I first encountered Beckett through two novels that are not widely read, even in the university: Watt and Molloy. Simply put, these books forced me to reconsider what serious writing might look like. (I was then completing an M.Phil. thesis on T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets and wisdom literature.) Beckett and the Modern Novel was written out of a desire to come to terms, if I can put it that way, with what was happening in those books.

You know that Beckett reluctantly gave a series of lectures in 1930 to students at Trinity College, Dublin, and that two main sets of notes taken by Beckett’s students survive. Re-reading Beckett’s early fiction, guided by cues drawn from the lecture notes, I demonstrated that his take on what he called ‘The Modern Novel’ was largely cribbed from a pre-existing body of theory, French in origin, and in particular from work by an unacknowledged influence: André Gide. Further, Beckett then began to deploy and extend such theory in his early novels, which generated the fragmented form and ‘tripartite’ characters that have often puzzled commentators. From the beginning then, Beckett’s thought should be read alongside a body of Continental experimental writing of the pre-war period; and it was from this context that he also drew key paradoxes culminating in his mature theory of an art of ‘failure’. It seemed to me that Gide would be the last major influence on Beckett’s novelistic theory and practice that we would likely discover (so far I have been proven correct).

The monograph also allowed me to spend time with some of Beckett’s fictional interlocutors and inheritors, particularly in the French context: Sade, Bataille, Robbe-Grillet, and others.” — John Samuel Bolin

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Gare St Lazare Ireland to perform extracts from Beckett’s Watt, First Love, and Other Texts at the Abbey Theatre

In exploring the use of music in Samuel Beckett’s work, Gare St Lazare Ireland have created an entirely original performance that defies easy description.  A meditation, a celebration, an interpretation; Here All Night’s absence of linear narrative frees us to go where the words and music bring us and offers another way to access both Beckett’s world and our own.

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Here All Night

ArtsEmerson, 5-9 October 2016 The prose and music of Samuel Beckett’s writing find new life, and a fresh resonance, in this stunning new theatrical work for soprano, actor and chamber orchestra. Arriving from Ireland as part of a year-long celebration of the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising, Here All Night brings back the players…

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