Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Aftermath

“[James McNaughton’s] Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Aftermath explores Beckett’s literary responses to the political maelstroms of his formative and middle years: the Irish civil war and the crisis of commitment in 1930s Europe, the rise of fascism and the atrocities of World War II. Archive yields a Beckett who monitored propaganda in speeches and newspapers, and whose creative work engages with specific political strategies, rhetoric, and events. Finally, Beckett’s political aesthetic sharpens into focus.

Deep within form, Beckett models ominous historical developments as surely as he satirizes artistic and philosophical interpretations that overlook them. He burdens aesthetic production with guilt: imagination and language, theater and narrative, all parallel political techniques. Beckett comically embodies conservative religious and political doctrines; he plays Irish colonial history against contemporary European horrors; he examines aesthetic complicity in effecting atrocity and covering it up. This book offers insightful, original, and vivid readings of Beckett’s work up to Three Novels and Endgame.”

— Oxford University Press

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Beckett, Lacan and the Mathematical Writing of the Real

Beckett, Lacan and the Mathematical Writing of the Real proposes writing as a mathematical and logical operation to build a bridge between Lacanian psychoanalysis and Samuel Beckett’s prose works. Arka Chattopadhyay studies aspects such as the fundamental operational logic of a text, use of mathematical forms like geometry and arithmetic, the human obsession with counting, the moving body as an act of writing and love, and sexuality as a challenge to the limits of what can be written through logic and mathematics. Chattopadhyay reads Beckett’s prose works, including How It Is, Company, Worstward Ho, Malone Dies and Enough to highlight this terminal writing, which halts endless meanings with the material body of the word and gives Beckett a medium to inscribe what cannot be written otherwise.

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Eimear McBride on Beckett’s Development as a Writer

“Of all I’ve read in my life, and all that’s yet to come, what’s going to count? How much of it has changed me? How much has even marked me? How much has done both but I don’t know it yet? Readers get to make these discoveries in the privacy of their own heads. Writers must make them in public and then wear them in their back catalogues for as long as they have a readership who cares.”

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Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Aftermath

Oxford University Press: “[James McNaughton’s] Samuel Beckett and the Politics of Aftermath explores Beckett’s creative responses to the Irish civil war and the crisis of commitment in 1930s Europe, to the rise of fascism, and the atrocities of World War II. Grounded in archival material, the volume reads in Beckett’s letters and German Diaries his personal response to propaganda he saw leading to war, and illustrates his creative work’s intimate engagement with specific political strategies, rhetoric, and events.

Deep into literary form, syntax, and language, Beckett reflects ominous political and historical changes, and satirizes aesthetic and philosophical interpretations that overlook them. He burdens aesthetic production with guilt for how imagination and language, theatre, and narrative parallel political techniques, the aspiration to both effect atrocity and cover it up. This book develops new readings of Beckett’s early and middle work up toThree Novels and Endgame.”

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The Making of Samuel Beckett’s ‘Malone Dies’/’Malone meurt’

Originally published in French as Malone meurt in 1951 and later translated into English by the author himself, Malone Dies is the second novel of Samuel Beckett’s Trilogy.

The Making of Samuel Beckett’s ‘Malone Dies’/’Malone meurt’ is a comprehensive reference guide to the history of the text. The book includes: a complete descriptive catalogue of available relevant manuscripts, including French and English texts, alternative drafts and notebook pages; a critical reconstruction of the history of the history of the text, from its genesis through the process of composition to its full publication history; a detailed guide to exploring the manuscripts online at the Beckett Digital Manuscripts Project at http://www.beckettarchive.org.

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Gare St Lazare Ireland to perform extracts from Beckett’s Watt, First Love, and Other Texts at the Abbey Theatre

In exploring the use of music in Samuel Beckett’s work, Gare St Lazare Ireland have created an entirely original performance that defies easy description.  A meditation, a celebration, an interpretation; Here All Night’s absence of linear narrative frees us to go where the words and music bring us and offers another way to access both Beckett’s world and our own.

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Gare St. Lazare Ireland Perform The Beckett Trilogy

Samuel Beckett’s towering novels Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable cycle between comic storytelling by a philosophical vagrant, an elderly man lost to memory and fantasy, and a paralyzed protagonist. In this evening-length theatrical rendition featuring excerpts from these novels, preeminent Beckett interpreters Conor Lovett and Judy Hegarty Lovett offer an embodiment of this existential trinity in a profound solo performance exploring the precision of language and Beckett’s remarkably uplifting worldview.

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Conor Lovett to perform Beckett Trilogy at White Light Festival

Samuel Beckett’s towering novels Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable cycle between comic storytelling by a philosophical vagrant, an elderly man lost to memory and fantasy, and a paralyzed protagonist. In this evening-length theatrical rendition featuring excerpts from these novels, preeminent Beckett interpreters Conor Lovett and Judy Hegarty Lovett offer an embodiment of this existential trinity in a profound solo performance exploring the precision of language and Beckett’s remarkably uplifting worldview.

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